To Which Generation Does Jesus Refer In The Olivet Discourse? Part 2

http://www.toughquestionsanswered.org/2017/02/24/to-which-generation-does-jesus-refer-in-the-olivet-discourse-part-2/

The Narrow Door

Luke 13:22-30

Read Don’s comments about this passage in his on-going blog articles on Luke at: https://lifereference.wordpress.com/2017/02/23/the-narrow-door-3/

Great Verses of the Bible: 2Peter 3:9

world-on-fire

The late John Clark, a powerful gospel preacher of the 20th century, used to tell a story about a Preacher waxing eloquent to a packed house about the second coming of Christ.

“I am coming soon,” he paraphrased Jesus’ promise.

With greater emphasis, he repeated, “I am coming soon.”

Finally, as he stood on the edge of the stage, with fevered pitched emotion, he shouted, “I am coming soon.”

At that point he lost his balance and landed in the lap of a sister in the first row. Obviously embarrassed, the Preacher quickly got up and profusely apologized.

The sister said, “That ok. You warned me three times you were coming. I should have been ready.”

The Bible repeated warns of Christ’s coming. Yet many people either do not believe it, or do not consider it very seriously.  Most people are not ready.

In one of the great texts of the Bible, the apostle Peter reminds us of Jesus’ return with these stirring words:

“The Lord is not slack concerning His promise, as some count slackness, but is longsuffering toward us, not willing that any should perish but that all should come to repentance. But the day of the Lord will come as a thief in the night, in which the heavens will pass away with a great noise, and the elements will melt with fervent heat; both the earth and the works that are in it will be burned up” (2 Peter 3:9-10)

Continue: https://thepreachersword.com/2017/02/22/great-verses-of-the-bible-2peter-39/

Lion The Lamb – video by Bart+Tricia

http://www.godtube.com/watch/?v=1FJC1CNU&utm_source=GodTube%20Must-See%20Video&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=02/21/2017

Peace, Discord and Division

“I have come to bring fire on the earth, and how I wish it were already kindled! But I have a baptism to undergo, and what constraint I am under until it is completed! Do you think I came to bring peace on earth? No, I tell you, but division. From now on there will be five in one family divided against each other, three against two and two against three. They will be divided, father against son and son against father, mother against daughter and daughter against mother, mother-in-law against daughter-in-law and daughter-in-law against mother-in-law.”

Luke 12: 49-53

Read Don’s comments at: https://lifereference.wordpress.com/2017/02/20/peace-discord-and-division/

Your advocate – podcast

https://maxlucado.com/listen/your-advocate/

Is “He is Risen” Passive? (Matt 28:6)

Bill Mounce

William D. [Bill] Mounce posts about the Greek language and exegesis on the ZA Blog. He is the president of BiblicalTraining.org, a ministry that creates and distributes world-class educational courses at no cost. He is also the author of numerous works including the bestselling Basics of Biblical Greek and a corresponding online class. He served as the New Testament chair of the English Standard Version Bible translation, and is currently on the Committee for Bible Translation for the NIV.

The other day in class we translated what Herod said about John. “This is John the Baptist; he has risen (ἠγέρθη) from the dead, and that is why miraculous powers are at work in him” (Matt 14:2; NASB). ἠγέρθη is an aorist passive and a student asked why the NASB didn’t translate it as a passive.

This becomes a more important question when we realize that passives are used of Jesus being raised from the dead. “He is not here, for He has risen (ἠγέρθη), just as He said. Come, see the place where He was lying” (Matt 28:6). The NIV also uses “he has risen,” which is transitive but I am not sure it is passive. The NLT uses an almost stative, “He is risen.” CSB (formerly the HCSB) has an explicit passive: “For He has been resurrected” (“has been raised,” NET).

And why was the NASB not consistent? In Matt 26:32 they translate the passive as a passive, “But after I have been raised (μετὰ … τὸ ἐγερθῆναί με), I will go ahead of you to Galilee.”

It is of the utmost theological importance to see that God the Father raised Jesus as a vindication of his perfect sacrifice and a validation that in fact Jesus had done everything he came to do. τετέλεσθαι.

So how do you hear “he is risen”? Do you hear it as an active or a divine passive?

Comment at: http://zondervanacademic.com/blog/is-he-is-risen-passive-matt-286-mondays-with-mounce-273/