Preach like Hebrews

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The book of Hebrews is the only letter in the Bible that contains an inspired sermon, and as such pastors should model their sermons after Hebrews more than the styles of communication popular today.

Hebrews is certainly a written letter that contains the content of the author’s sermon. The point of the sermon was to express the pastor’s concern for the congregation’s perseverance. If you open your Bible to Hebrews, the first thing you notice is that it doesn’t begin like any of Paul’s letters or like anything else in New Testament literature. It’s different. It has a stunning start. “The Spirit expressly says…” The opening statement is confessional in character and compels attention. It engages in auditor or reader immediately. The preacher has a sense of urgency. He wants to compel his congregation to perseverance.

He moves from there to the issue of the superiority of Christ. The author writes to warn against drifting and to encourage steadfastness in his recipients. He does this by urging, warning and proving that Jesus is “better” than all that came before. 

This should be our model as well. The ancient, inspired, anonymous preacher provides a paradigm for preaching that transcends his audience and time period and instructs us as communicators in the modern age. This dazzling portrait of Christ ought to motivate an expositor today to ensure that their sermon is fixed and focused on the Son of God, and his glory.

Read the rest: http://thecripplegate.com/preach-like-hebrews/

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Preach like Hebrews

Image result for Preaching shadows

The book of Hebrews is the only letter in the Bible that contains an inspired sermon, and as such pastors should model their sermons after Hebrews more than the styles of communication popular today.

Hebrews is certainly a written letter that contains the content of the author’s sermon. The point of the sermon was to express the pastor’s concern for the congregation’s perseverance. If you open your Bible to Hebrews, the first thing you notice is that it doesn’t begin like any of Paul’s letters or like anything else in New Testament literature. It’s different. It has a stunning start. “The Spirit expressly says…” The opening statement is confessional in character and compels attention. It engages in auditor or reader immediately. The preacher has a sense of urgency. He wants to compel his congregation to perseverance.

He moves from there to the issue of the superiority of Christ. The author writes to warn against drifting and to encourage steadfastness in his recipients. He does this by urging, warning and proving that Jesus is “better” than all that came before.

This should be our model as well. The ancient, inspired, anonymous preacher provides a paradigm for preaching that transcends his audience and time period and instructs us as communicators in the modern age. This dazzling portrait of Christ ought to motivate an expositor today to ensure that their sermon is fixed and focused on the Son of God, and his glory.

Its not just that Hebrews is fixed on the glory of Christ, but the preacher uses every rhetorical tool in the toolbox to paint a beautiful picture of Christ. Too much of modern preaching is some kind of half-baked, ill-conceived, conversational, off the cuff, shoot-from-the-hip sort of approach, but that’s not the preaching in the Book of Hebrews.

 

Read the rest: http://thecripplegate.com/preach-like-hebrews/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed:+TheCripplegate+(The+Cripplegate)

Preach like Hebrews

by Austin Duncan

The book of Hebrews is the only letter in the Bible that contains an inspired sermon, and as such pastors should model their sermons after Hebrews more than the styles of communication popular today.

Hebrews is certainly a written letter that contains the content of the author’s sermon. The point of the sermon was to express the pastor’s concern for the congregation’s perseverance. If you open your Bible to Hebrews, the first thing you notice is that it doesn’t begin like any of Paul’s letters or like anything else in New Testament literature. It’s different. It has a stunning start. “The Spirit expressly says…” The opening statement is confessional in character and compels attention. It engages in auditor or reader immediately. The preacher has a sense of urgency. He wants to compel his congregation to perseverance.

He moves from there to the issue of the superiority of Christ. The author writes to warn against drifting and to encourage steadfastness in his recipients. He does this by urging, warning and proving that Jesus is “better” than all that came before. 

This should be our model as well. The ancient, inspired, anonymous preacher provides a paradigm for preaching that transcends his audience and time period and instructs us as communicators in the modern age. This dazzling portrait of Christ ought to motivate an expositor today to ensure that their sermon is fixed and focused on the Son of God, and his glory.

Its not just that Hebrews is fixed on the glory of Christ, but the preacher uses every rhetorical tool in the toolbox to paint a beautiful picture of Christ. Too much of modern preaching is some kind of half-baked, ill-conceived, conversational, off the cuff, shoot-from-the-hip sort of approach, but that’s not the preaching in the Book of Hebrews.

Continue: http://thecripplegate.com/preach-like-hebrews/

Gurus vs shepherds

2shepherds

38 Signs You Are a Godly Leader

~ Dodd

Last week I wrote a post titled 38 Results of Being an Evil LeaderThe content for this post was taken from specific passages from Proverbs chapters 10–12. As a following up, the following are 38 Signs You Are a Godly Leader taken from the same set of verses. As you read this list, remember none of this happens without brokenness, humility, a life of surrender to Christ, a love of prayer and a passion for reading God’s Word, the Bible. Proverbs 10 with supporting verses

  1. Godly Leaders Are Life-Giving – 16 “The wage of the righteous leads to life, the gain of the wicked to sin.”
  2. Godly Leaders Speak Great Value Into the Lives of Others – 20 “The tongue of the righteous is choice silver; the heart of the wicked is of little worth.”
  3. The Words of Godly Leaders Are Satisfying – 21 “The lips of the righteous feed many, but fools die for lack of sense.”
  4. Godly Leaders’ Desires Are Granted – 24 “What the wicked dreads will come upon him, but the desire of the righteous will be granted.”

https://churchleaders.com/pastors/pastor-articles/318402-38-signs-godly-leader-brian-dodd.html

Shepherds

2shepherds

Fill Believers, Not Buildings: Why Success in Ministry Isn’t a Numbers Game

https://www.9marks.org/article/fill-believers-not-buildings-why-success-in-ministry-isnt-a-numbers-game/