Three Keys to Accessing More of God’s Power

I am going through a healing prayer course at my church and the last two weeks have been on the power of the Holy Spirit, so I thought I’d post some thoughts on the topic here.

Francis MacNutt, from Christian Healing Ministries, summarizes  2 Timothy 3, where Paul says,

“In the last days they will maintain the form of religion, but will have left out the real power of it.”

Continue: https://alikennedylive.com/2017/10/16/three-keys-to-accessing-more-of-gods-power/

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The transforming power of the Spirit!

from J. C. Ryle, “The Lord’s Garden”

“To all those in Rome who are loved by God and called to be saints.” Romans 1:7

Believers are separated from the world by the effectual working of the Holy Spirit. The Spirit calls them out from the world, and separates them as effectually as if a wall were built between them and it. He puts in them . . .

new hearts,
new minds,
new tastes,
new desires,
new sorrows,
new joys,
new wishes,
new pleasures,
new longings.

He gives them . . .

new eyes,
new ears,
new affections,
new opinions.

He makes them new creatures. They are born again–and with a new birth they begin a new existence. Mighty indeed is the transforming power of the Spirit!

found by Steve Rebus

Do Not Grieve the Holy Spirit

Holy Spirit Grieve

One mark of a successful sermon is that it satisfactorily answers some questions while provoking still others. On Sunday I visited a little church in an eastern-Ontario village and heard just such a sermon. The pastor preached on Ephesians 4 as part of a series on the Christian’s identity in Christ, but as he continued through the text he was only barely able to speak to verse 30: “And do not grieve the Holy Spirit of God, by whom you were sealed for the day of redemption.” I later found myself asking, What does it mean to grieve the Holy Spirit? My initial reaction to the word grieve in reference to the Holy Spirit was a negative one: Surely the Spirit of God does not actually grieve, does he? Perhaps this is a poor translation. Isn’t sorrow a too-human reaction to ascribe to the holy God? Doesn’t it diminish the Spirit to suggest that my sin can make him feel genuine sorrow?

Thankfully I take my entire theological library on the road with me thanks to the magic of Logos, so I was able to first meditate on the text and then to research it a little bit. What I found is that grieve is actually a very faithful rendering. It is, in fact, the preferred rendering of the word for every major translation, new or old, with the exception of the NLT which prefers the synonymous bring sorrow to. The Bible dictionaries agree: the Greek word λυπέω indicates grief, sorrow and distress. So somehow our sin really can bring grief to God and, according to the immediate context, this is especially true for the sins of the mouth that cause disunity between believers.

Continue: https://churchleaders.com/outreach-missions/outreach-missions-articles/310384-not-grieve-holy-spirit-tim-challies.html

“Your” Holy Spirit

Your Holy Spirit

The Holy Spirit never lets a man . . . .

The Holy Spirit in a man

(Podcast) Message: “The Personal Power of the Holy Spirit in the Church” (Acts 4:32-5:11)

https://bellatorchristi.com/2017/08/18/podcast-message-the-personal-power-of-the-holy-spirit-in-the-church-acts-432-511/

By My Spirit

 

Then he answered and spoke to me, saying, ‘This is the word of Yahweh to Zerubbabel, saying, ‘Not by might, nor by power, but by my Spirit,’ says Yahweh of Hosts.’ Zechariah 4:6 WEB

Read the blog at: http://www.refreshinghope.org/blogs/1/1528