Why Your Church Members Don’t Pray Much

Yesterday was the National Day of Prayer in the United States. My evidence is anecdotal, but it seems to me that most church members don’t pray much, despite efforts like the Day of Prayer. In general, they talk about prayer much more than they actually pray. Here’s why that happens:

  1. Some are not genuine believers. Jesus Himself had one fake among His group, and we’re not likely to do better. We shouldn’t be surprised when non-believers among us don’t really know how to pray.
  2. No one has ever taught them to pray. We’ve told them to pray, but we’ve not taught them how to pray. Consequently, they don’t pray—and they often feel guilty because they don’t–and can’t–do what we’ve told them to do.

Read the rest: http://chucklawless.com/2018/05/why-your-church-members-dont-pray-much/

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John Stott: One of the Most Neglected Themes in the Bible

Whole life discipleship

https://churchleaders.com/pastors/videos-for-pastors/176790-john-stott-one-of-the-most-neglected-themes-in-the-bible.html

Preach like Hebrews

Image result for Preaching shadows

The book of Hebrews is the only letter in the Bible that contains an inspired sermon, and as such pastors should model their sermons after Hebrews more than the styles of communication popular today.

Hebrews is certainly a written letter that contains the content of the author’s sermon. The point of the sermon was to express the pastor’s concern for the congregation’s perseverance. If you open your Bible to Hebrews, the first thing you notice is that it doesn’t begin like any of Paul’s letters or like anything else in New Testament literature. It’s different. It has a stunning start. “The Spirit expressly says…” The opening statement is confessional in character and compels attention. It engages in auditor or reader immediately. The preacher has a sense of urgency. He wants to compel his congregation to perseverance.

He moves from there to the issue of the superiority of Christ. The author writes to warn against drifting and to encourage steadfastness in his recipients. He does this by urging, warning and proving that Jesus is “better” than all that came before. 

This should be our model as well. The ancient, inspired, anonymous preacher provides a paradigm for preaching that transcends his audience and time period and instructs us as communicators in the modern age. This dazzling portrait of Christ ought to motivate an expositor today to ensure that their sermon is fixed and focused on the Son of God, and his glory.

Read the rest: http://thecripplegate.com/preach-like-hebrews/

Preach like Hebrews

Image result for Preaching shadows

The book of Hebrews is the only letter in the Bible that contains an inspired sermon, and as such pastors should model their sermons after Hebrews more than the styles of communication popular today.

Hebrews is certainly a written letter that contains the content of the author’s sermon. The point of the sermon was to express the pastor’s concern for the congregation’s perseverance. If you open your Bible to Hebrews, the first thing you notice is that it doesn’t begin like any of Paul’s letters or like anything else in New Testament literature. It’s different. It has a stunning start. “The Spirit expressly says…” The opening statement is confessional in character and compels attention. It engages in auditor or reader immediately. The preacher has a sense of urgency. He wants to compel his congregation to perseverance.

He moves from there to the issue of the superiority of Christ. The author writes to warn against drifting and to encourage steadfastness in his recipients. He does this by urging, warning and proving that Jesus is “better” than all that came before.

This should be our model as well. The ancient, inspired, anonymous preacher provides a paradigm for preaching that transcends his audience and time period and instructs us as communicators in the modern age. This dazzling portrait of Christ ought to motivate an expositor today to ensure that their sermon is fixed and focused on the Son of God, and his glory.

Its not just that Hebrews is fixed on the glory of Christ, but the preacher uses every rhetorical tool in the toolbox to paint a beautiful picture of Christ. Too much of modern preaching is some kind of half-baked, ill-conceived, conversational, off the cuff, shoot-from-the-hip sort of approach, but that’s not the preaching in the Book of Hebrews.

 

Read the rest: http://thecripplegate.com/preach-like-hebrews/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed:+TheCripplegate+(The+Cripplegate)

Toward Complementarian Clarity

Part of an on-going debate among some

https://cbmw.org/topics/1-timothy-2/toward-complementarian-clarity/

10 Questions I Wonder If Churches Ever Ask . . .

~ Chuck Lawless

I’m just thinking aloud here today as I wonder if many churches in North America ever ask these questions:

  1. Why have we not done anything about years of decline? I don’t understand why nobody speaks up about this problem. Too many churches sleep themselves into death.
  2. Are we reaching any non-believers? Even growing churches—including young church plants—often fail to ask this question. Transfer growth, though, will never reach the world.
  3. If we weren’t here, would our community miss our church? The only way to answer this question is to ask the community if they even know you exist. You might be surprised by their answer.

The rest is at: http://chucklawless.com/2018/02/10-questions-i-wonder-if-churches-ever-ask/

Preach like Hebrews

by Austin Duncan

The book of Hebrews is the only letter in the Bible that contains an inspired sermon, and as such pastors should model their sermons after Hebrews more than the styles of communication popular today.

Hebrews is certainly a written letter that contains the content of the author’s sermon. The point of the sermon was to express the pastor’s concern for the congregation’s perseverance. If you open your Bible to Hebrews, the first thing you notice is that it doesn’t begin like any of Paul’s letters or like anything else in New Testament literature. It’s different. It has a stunning start. “The Spirit expressly says…” The opening statement is confessional in character and compels attention. It engages in auditor or reader immediately. The preacher has a sense of urgency. He wants to compel his congregation to perseverance.

He moves from there to the issue of the superiority of Christ. The author writes to warn against drifting and to encourage steadfastness in his recipients. He does this by urging, warning and proving that Jesus is “better” than all that came before. 

This should be our model as well. The ancient, inspired, anonymous preacher provides a paradigm for preaching that transcends his audience and time period and instructs us as communicators in the modern age. This dazzling portrait of Christ ought to motivate an expositor today to ensure that their sermon is fixed and focused on the Son of God, and his glory.

Its not just that Hebrews is fixed on the glory of Christ, but the preacher uses every rhetorical tool in the toolbox to paint a beautiful picture of Christ. Too much of modern preaching is some kind of half-baked, ill-conceived, conversational, off the cuff, shoot-from-the-hip sort of approach, but that’s not the preaching in the Book of Hebrews.

Continue: http://thecripplegate.com/preach-like-hebrews/