7 Reasons pastoring a church is harder today

http://chucklawless.com/2017/02/7-reasons-pastoring-a-church-is-harder-today/

10 Things i look for in a church leader

Ihttp://chucklawless.com/2017/02/10-things-i-look-for-in-a-church-leader/

The Difficult Duty of Discipline

DisciplineOver the past couple of weeks, we’ve been examining what the New Testament says about dealing with sin in the church. To learn how the church is to deal with sin in its midst, we’ve turned principally to Paul’s words in 2 Corinthians 2:5-11. There, Paul discusses his dealings with a sinning member of the Corinthian church who has now repentant and seeking restoration to the fellowship of the church at Corinth. However, the church is struggling to accept this repentant brother because of the severity of his sin and the way it has affected Paul himself. Paul writes to encourage the church to restore him. In that passage, Paul outlines five stages of successful church discipline (or perhaps better termed, church restoration). Two weeks ago, we took a look at the first stage, which was the harmful sin that makes discipline necessary. This week, we look to stage number two, which is corporate discipline.

2 Corinthians 2:6 says, “Sufficient for such a one is this punishment which was inflicted by the majority.”

The word that gets translated “punishment,” is epitimía. It’s a technical, legal term that in secular Greek refers to an official disciplinary act. And this official act of discipline was carried out “by the majority.” That is to say, the church had a formal gathering, and deliberated upon this matter, and rendered a verdict. This is none other than the outworking of the process of formal, organized, official church discipline.

The New Testament Doctrine of Church Discipline

Continue: http://thecripplegate.com/the-difficult-duty-of-discipline/#more-203170

The only safe place for a sheep

safe-place

Ninety Nine Sheep

http://www.refreshinghope.org/blogs/1/1162

Most Churches Are Still Uninterested

Those who believe in the existence of God, yet reject Christianity, can still be reached for Christ. I sometimes think this group of “nones” has rejected their experience in the Church rather than their belief in Jesus. That may simply be a reflection of the sad, non-evidential nature of the Church rather than a reflection of the strong evidential nature of Christianity. Some of those who have left our ranks may never have heard anything about the evidence supporting the Christian worldview in all the years they were attending church with us. My own anecdotal experience, as I speak at churches around the country, supports this uncomfortable hypothesis. Most churches are still uninterested in making the case for Christianity, while more and more Christians want to know why Christianity is true. — J Warner Wallace, Why the Case for Christianity Is More Important Than Ever

8 Habits of Healthy Spiritual Leaders

Wisdom for all leaders

http://www.churchleaders.com/pastors/pastor-articles/290743-8-habits-healthy-spiritual-leaders-matt-brown.html