The Difference Between Knowing and Showing God Exists

https://chab123.wordpress.com/2019/06/14/the-difference-between-knowing-and-showing-god-exists-2/

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A Pastor’s Reflections on Preaching About Faith & Science

~ Yancey Arrington

We recently finished up a sermon series on Faith & Science. It was one of the most well-attended, and highly invitational series in recent memory. Now that it’s over, I thought I’d offer a few reflections that come to mind.

#1: Congregants are more motivated about this topic than you think.

This was an easy topic to choose because we live in the backyard of NASA’s Johnson Space Center, and as such, a large percentage of our congregants and neighbors have occupations that intersect the sciences (e.g., engineers, astronauts, scientists, medical personnel). But don’t let that fool you into thinking that the subject of faith and science is one in which you should pass because your demographic may differ. I discovered that just as many people from non scientifically-oriented backgrounds were also deeply drawn to this series. If philosopher Dr. Charles Taylor and his critically-acclaimed book A Secular Age‘s description of modernity is accurate, we live in time where atheistic materialism has come to full flower. It is the explanation for everything. Science is king and Christianity, by contrast, is harangued as a pale imitation for understanding our world. These are the waters in which all of your congregants swim. It’s the fight they deal with as they disciple their children who are indoctrinated into the secular age. It’s for reasons like these that your people thirst to know how the Christian faith actually engages science instead of tucks tail and runs.

Read more: https://blog.yanceyarrington.com/2019/05/22/a-pastors-reflections-on-preaching-about-faith-science/

Responding to “You Can’t ‘Prove’ or ‘Disprove’ God’s Existence”

Over the years I have heard hundreds of objections to the Christian faith on a major college campus. One of the most common objections I hear is that there is no way to ‘prove’ or ‘disprove’ God’s existence. Sadly, this can allow a person to punt to some form of lazy agnosticism. Thus, they are off the hook and can ignore the God question. When this comes up, I now ask students what they mean by ‘prove’ and then I ask them if they know the difference between deductive, inductive or abductive proof. Unless they have taken an intro to logic course, in most cases, they don’t know any of these terms. I don’t bring this up to be snarky. Nor do I do it to try to show them how smart I am.  Nor am I trying to use confusing terminology. I am simply trying to get them to think through what they mean by the word ‘proof.’ See our chart here.

Read more at: https://chab123.wordpress.com/2019/06/07/responding-to-you-cant-prove-or-disprove-gods-existence-2/

Q&A: The Moral Argument, Moral Relativism, and Perfect Being Theology

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/CerebralFaith/~3/RbWgduljaFs/q-moral-argument-moral-relativism-and.html

“What does it mean to say the New Testament is ‘Historically Reliable?’”

https://chab123.wordpress.com/2019/05/31/what-does-it-mean-to-say-the-new-testament-is-historically-reliable-3/

Old News! Approaching Contradictions in the Gospels

https://chab123.wordpress.com/2019/05/30/old-news-approaching-contradictions-in-the-gospels/

Believing The Whole Bible Is True

I understand why atheists have trouble with the Bible. To be honest, it’s not an easy book. Some passages have led people to believe that God has handpicked who will be a Christian while other verses make it clear that His offer of salvation is open to the world. So which is it? Or can we chalk up these contradictions to the fact that the Bible isn’t reliable.

There are other issues—people use verses from 1 John to “prove” that Christians don’t sin (“No one who abides in Him sins; no one who sins has seen Him or knows Him” 1 John 3:6) whereas James tells the brethren that they are to confess their sins to one another. Peter tells Christians they are blessed if they suffer according to God’s will, but John wishes for his friend Gaius health and prosperity. The Old Testament is full of God’s judgment on Israel’s enemies (and on Israel), but Jesus commanded us to love our enemies.

Along with the apparent internal problems, there’s also the matter about the Bible and science. Many people look at the data scientists put out about the origin of the universe and compare that with what the Bible says—creation, spoken into being, in six days. Then there are the problems of miracles—seas parting, a donkey that talked, water pouring from a rock, the dead raised to life, a few loaves and fishes feeding thousands and thousands of people, blind men able to see, and a virgin birthing a Son. In other words, the Bible claims impossible things happened.

So there are apparent internal contradictions and apparent contradictions with reality as we know it. How then are we to handle the Bible?

 

Read more of the blog at: 9/believing-the-whole-bible-is-true-2/