How to Deal with Doubts about Your Faith

When doubt hit me

As I grew up in the church, I thought I knew the bible well.

I stopped thinking critically about it and no longer asked many questions. Then, from friends and the internet, I started hearing questions I didn’t know how to answer like:

“If God is all good, why does he allow so much evil in the world?”

“Why does God allowed our loved ones to die?”

Initially, instead of seeking answers for the questions, I tried to “have faith” and pushed them to the back of my mind.

But that didn’t work.

Doubts left unanswered can cripple a Christian’s faith.

They must be dealt with.

Read more at: https://allendalebaptist.org/doubts-faith-how-to

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Two Common Myths about the Spirit-Filled Life

Many Christians believe the myth that ‘Spirit-filled’ or even ‘spiritual’ must indicate something or someone a little strange. Depending on how much exposure people have had to the Pentecostal-Charismatic movement, they might associate the words ‘Spirit-filled’ with people who claim to be inspired by the Spirit to bark like dogs, scream, or roll around on the floor. Such people exist—I’ve seen them!

Eccentric Prophets

Some people try to justify their conclusion that it is spiritual to act strange by pointing to the eccentric behavior of prophets in the Old Testament. For example, Isaiah walked around naked (Isaiah 20:1–4)—some scholars say, wearing only an undergarment—and Ezekiel lay on his side for 430 days (Ezekiel 4:4–6). Some also point to Saul, who “changed into a different person” when the Spirit of the Lord came upon him and he prophesied (1 Samuel 10:6, 10).

These examples, however, don’t prove that one should expect to act strangely if one is to be truly spiritual. First of all, Saul might have just “changed into a different person” in the sense that “God changed Saul’s heart” before he prophesied (v. 9).

The Frantic Prophets of Baal

Read more:

James as “Wisdom Literature”

https://lifereference.wordpress.com/2019/02/12/james-as-wisdom-literature/

What Research Says About How Self-centeredness Grows in Us

http://ericgeiger.com/2019/02/what-research-says-about-how-self-centeredness-grows-in-us/

Let’s Stop Pointing to David’s Half-Naked Dancing to Justify Pop Worship

https://www.patheos.com/blogs/ponderanew/2019/02/06/lets-stop-pointing-to-davids-half-naked-dancing-to-justify-pop-worship/?utm_medium=email&utm_source=BRSS&utm_campaign=Evangelical&utm_content=253

Video – How to Explain the Trinity by Jeff Durbin

http://truthbomb.blogspot.com/2017/07/video-how-to-explain-trinity-by-jeff.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+blogspot%2FcOdLP+%28Truthbomb+Apologetics%29

5 Reasons Why a Handwritten “Thank You” Note Can Make a Difference

By Chuck Lawless

I know I’m dating myself here, but I believe many of us need to return to handwriting some thank you notes. I assume that all of us can name somebody who has blessed us, either for a long time or even just today. Here’s why taking the time to write a “thank you” note matters:

  1. It takes time—which shows some depth of gratitude. Think about it – you have to buy the card, write the note, find an address, address the envelope, and mail it. Sure, the card arrives much later than an email would, but the effort behind the “thank you” note is seldom missed.
  2. Few people do it—so it catches the attention of the receiver. An email “thank you” is easier to send, but it’s also easier to miss on the other end. A handwritten note, however, often catches the recipient by surprise. Its very uniqueness in our Internet-based world makes a difference.
  3. It feels much more personal. I know that’s an emotional response, but it’s often true nonetheless. Somehow, seeing the handwriting and signature of an affirming friend or loved one is different than receiving an email.
  4. It provides good memories. I still remember “thank you” notes that arrived at just the right time with just the right words from just the right person. God used those notes to encourage me then, and my memories of them still encourage me today. That’s one reason I’m writing this post today.
  5. It models a good habit for others. I know many people who’ve received gifts and support from others, but who never took the time to say, “thank you.” It is as if we sometimes think we’re entitled to something, so we see no need to express gratitude. We need to learn, though, from others who seldom miss an opportunity to say “thank you” via a handwritten note.

So, I encourage you this week/weekend to write at least five “thank you” notes to people who have blessed your life. Let them hear from you, in the words of the apostle Paul, “in my [your] own handwriting” (Gal. 6:11).