The Scandal of the Incarnation: A Closer Look at the Incarnation in Jewish Thought

Introduction

In the introduction of his book called The Case For The Real Jesus, author and apologist Lee Strobel says that a basic search for Jesus at Amazon.com will produce 175, 986 books on the most controversial figure in human history. Opinions about Jesus can range from him being a social revolutionary, an eschatological prophet, a social reformer, a source of a higher power, or even an enlightened being. For the Orthodox Christian, Jesus is God incarnate.It is assumed that the incarnation (a key doctrine in Christianity and to Messianic Judaism) is a concept that is foreign to mainstream Judaism. In Judaism, there is a term called “avodah zarah” which is defined as the formal recognition or worship as God of an entity that is in fact not God. In other words, any acceptance of a non-divine entity as your deity is a form of avodah zarah.

Let’s look at what Jews for Judaism says about this issue:

“The Jew equates worship of Jesus with idolatry. A Jew sees no room for discussion of this issue. A man cannot be God and that’s all there is to it. The missionary effort to present scriptural quotations as evidence to support his devotion to Jesus, is wasted on the Jew. God gave the Jewish people an understanding of Himself before He gave them the scriptures. The Jewish people read scripture in light of their understanding of God. It was God Himself who gave the Jewish people their conception of God, and it is through the lens of this fundamental teaching that we understand all subsequent revelation. The words of the prophets do not have the power to alter that which God Himself has taught us. The exact opposite is true. Our conception of God is the criterion by which the prophet’s words are evaluated.” (see full article here)

The Maimonides Objection

Go to: https://chab123.wordpress.com/2017/09/28/the-scandal-of-the-incarnation-a-closer-look-at-the-incarnation-in-jewish-thought-2/

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7 Reasons Why Church Members Don’t Know Their Church’s Doctrine

Have We Become Too Dependent on Songs?

The problem with worship songs is that we become dependent on them.

But I love songs. I really do. But they are a blessing and a curse. While worship is a song, it’s not only a song. And we can become so accustomed to songs that our hearts have forgotten how to worship.

When was the last time you were alone in a room without an incredible song, and just poured your heart out to God?

Have songs become more than they should be?

Preparation for Sunday morning becomes scouring CCLI for the top songs and picking our favorites. There’s no need to pray. There’s no need to consider our people. There’s no need for pastoral, theological consideration.

Instead of only picking songs, we should be asking these questions:

https://churchleaders.com/worship/worship-articles/310083-become-dependent-songs-david-santistevan.html

Worship Isn’t About Feelings

https://theblazingcenter.com/2017/09/worship-isnt-feelings.html

Commentary On Revelation 19 (Battle Of Armageddon)

http://www.toughquestionsanswered.org/2017/09/27/commentary-on-revelation-19-battle-of-armageddon/

Solus Christus

A Broadcast with Stephen Nichols

The gospel is only good news when we understand the bad news. Today, Stephen Nichols discusses why we all need Christ.

At: http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?e=10e1a68c17&u=32a41d449a635dc91898c8337&id=bc20735da4

If I Were The Devil . . .

Because Satan knows that fallout is widespread when leaders crumble, he always aims his arrows at those who lead God’s church.  He wins, at least temporarily, when failings –whether among laity or staff – distract the church from doing the Great Commission. Were I the enemy, here is how I would attack leaders today.

  1. I would attack those who are most gifted . . . by reminding them that they are gifted.  Seldom does the enemy attack so blatantly that his attack is undeniable – especially when striking leaders so gifted that they think they are impenetrable to attack. Gifted leaders rarely settle for second place in anything; hence, they often refuse to believe that they can lose spiritual battles.  Such subtle arrogance sets them up for defeat.
  2. I would encourage leaders to talk about accountability . . . but not be personally accountable to anyone.  Few leaders would deny the importance of accountability, even if they themselves are accountable to no one.  After all, leaders lead from their strengths – and who needs accountability for his strengths?  And what leader is willing to risk his leadership by admitting his weaknesses?  Accountability that is just a buzzword, though, is only a wasted word.

More? Go to: http://chucklawless.com/2017/09/if-i-were-the-devil/