What Do We Learn from the Gospel of MARK about the Holy Spirit?

https://larrydixon.wordpress.com/2019/12/07/the-forgotten-third-developing-a-relationship-with-god-the-holy-spirit-what-do-we-learn-from-the-gospel-of-mark-about-the-holy-spirit/

Podcast – Four Steps to Proper Biblical Interpretation

https://bellatorchristi.com/2019/12/03/podcast-12-2-19-four-steps-to-proper-biblical-interpretation/

Is Bart Ehrman Right When He Says Ephesians And Colossians Were Forged?

https://isjesusalive.com/were-ephesians-and-colossians-forged/

Does the New Testament Really Have a Unifying Centre? Maybe, Maybe Not!

One of the problems with coming up with a New Testament Theology is the many diversities within the New Testament, this poses a genuine problem for interpreters who are trying to identify a theological core in the New Testament, but the problem is not insurmountable.

To restate the problem, the differences across the New Testament collection are well rehearsed: Paul versus the Jerusalem church, the Synoptics versus John, the Lucan Paul and versus the Paul of the epistles, John the Elder vs the docetists and secessionists, and then in the second century the proto-orthodox church versus the Valentinians, Marcionites, and Ebionites. Concrete examples of this diversity and divergence in the New Testament are not hard to find. Although I am convinced that one can easily reconcile James’ and Paul’s account of “faith” and “works,”[1] nonetheless, one will have to admit that they differ markedly over the application of Gen 15:6 to Christ-believers. Whereas James incorporates a standard Jewish interpretive strategy of reading Gen 15:6 in light of Gen 22:9-18 (see 1 Macc 2:52), this is an approach that Paul explicitly rejects in Romans 4 and Galatians 3 whereby Paul disallows any attempt to read Abraham’s subsequent act of obedience back into Gen 15:6 or otherwise it would make salvation based on works and not grace. Similar disparities emerge if we look at different views on food sacrificed to idols in the New Testament. The Jerusalem council (Acts 15:28-29) and words of the risen Jesus according to John the Seer (Rev 2:14, 20) expressly forbid eating food sacrificed to idols, whereas Paul treats it purely as a matter of personal conscience (1 Cor 8:1-13; 10:25-33; Rom 14:15-23). This arguably signifies different strategies for negotiating the contamination of idolatry even if everyone agreed that idolatry should be avoided. It is diversities such as these – as well as genre, perspective, situation, intertextuality, and rhetoric – that also pose a serious challenge to identifying a theology nucleus or a type of theological centre to the New Testament. How does one find a theological centre in diverse and sometimes disparate materials? Afterall, what is prominent in Paul might be peripheral to Peter. What is affirmed in Paul and Luke-Acts (Christians can live peaceably under the aegis of the Roman empire) might be repudiated in the Apocalypse of John (Christians long for the empire to be burned to the ground). What is judged to be the central message of the New Testament might not even appear in the theology of the epistle of Jude. For many scholars, a New Testament theology is merely the chronicle of a cacophony of irreconcilable conflicting interpretations and plays for power.[2] To be honest, I think it is clear that trying to curate the New Testament into a tidy and timeless theology with a homogenous core is deeply problematic because of the New Testament’s inherent diversities, the on-going and often unresolved debates taking place, and even the developments of views held by New Testament authors.

Continue: https://www.patheos.com/blogs/euangelion/2019/11/does-the-new-testament-really-have-a-unifying-centre-maybe-maybe-not/

The Prologue of John’s Gospel

A Broadcast with R.C. Sproul

The gospel of John begins with an exalted view of Christ as the divine Logos, the Word of God. Today, R.C. Sproul explores the significance of the titles attributed to Jesus in these opening verses.

Does Jeremiah 29:11 Apply To You?

“For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope.” Jer. 29:11

Read the blog: https://corechristianity.com/resource-library/articles/does-jeremiah-29-11-apply-to-you

The Letter of Hebrews and the Church

https://www.patheos.com/blogs/jesuscreed/2019/09/19/the-letter-of-hebrews-and-the-church/