7 Things I’ve Learned about Following God

~ Ron Edmundson

For the last 30 years or so, I’ve attempted to listen to, obey and follow the voice of God. I have never heard it audibly but I have had it for only impressed upon my heart and mind. I have actually been a believer for over 40 years, but I got serious about my faith in my early 20’s.

It’s been a long road, and I’m still a pilgrim in the process, but I’ve learned a few things along the way. These are based totally on my personal experience.

Here are 7 things I’ve learned about following God:

I’ve never been able to see very far down the road. God seems to keep me from seeing all the details in advance. Sometimes I get a clear vision of a big goal God has for me, but I usually have no clue at the time how to get there.

The road for following God has never seemed to be easily paved. I assumed if I was doing things “His way” things would go my way. But, just being obedient doesn’t always remove the obstacles. This has always required faith. Thankfully, without faith it’s impossible to please God.

The rest are at: http://www.ronedmondson.com/2017/03/10-random-thoughts-about-following-god.html

7 Things To Do While You are Waiting on God

http://www.ronedmondson.com/2017/02/7-actions-while-waiting-on-god.html

7 Thoughts on Creating Unity

by Ron Edmondson on Ron Edmonson blog


I was in a church recently that struggles with disunity. The pastor has a great vision and is supported by most everyone, but the church has two dominant factions, mostly split over a denominational issue. In working with the church, I quickly assessed they had a unity problem. I felt like a genius consultant, but the truth is I only discovered what they already knew.

The problem wasn’t discovering the problem, it was in finding solutions. The church needs to come together if they hope to move forward and complete all the opportunities God is sending their way.

How do you create unity in a church?

Here are 7 thoughts on creating unity:

Avoid the core DNA when making changes – There are some things that are not worth changing; especially until unity returns. It makes no sense to create further disunity in an area where the church is already unified. For example, if the church is overwhelmingly supportive of Sunday school, but you are a proponent of small groups, don’t try to make that change now (if ever) until unity is achieved.

Find common ground – What do people agree upon? Again, maybe its Sunday school, but perhaps it’s reaching the community’s lower income families. It could be a ministry of adoption or homelessness. There are probably numerous ministries or interests within the church about which everyone is passionate. Find some and pour energy into them. The more of these you can identify and rally people around, the more unified the church will become.

Plan group activities – This can be an ice cream social or a ministry opportunity to one of the common issues, but it should be something that will involve people from both sides of the divide. It would be best if you could get someone from each faction to the planning table for these events. Most likely there are some who, though they have chosen a “side” to support, are mature enough that they can work with someone of a different opinion to plan a function.

Celebrate success – Something about celebrating brings people together. Find small wins and celebrate them. Celebrate the things that people agree upon. Often this will be the history of the church or the heart the church has for missions or ministry.

Challenge the few objectors – There are usually a few people who are naturally divisive. This number is usually smaller than it appears, but these people are critical of everything and usually bring down the morale of others and the church. You may have to pull them aside, ask them to cooperate, and, if they will not, work to remove them from power. (This is obviously the subject of another blog post, but a necessary part of creating unity.) The unity and vision of the church is more important than appeasing those whose only mission is to disrupt.

Embrace the influencers – Just as there are a few who are negative, there are usually a few who are positive about unity and who have influence over others. I believe in the “each one reach one” practice. Spend time with these influencers, help them understand the importance of unity, then encourage and release them to help shape an atmosphere and culture of unity, one person at a time. Keep these natural influencers and encouragers close and informed and empower them to help create unity.

Communicate effectively – Communication is always important, but especially during times of disunity that information flow freely. When people don’t have information, they assume you are keeping it from them intentionally. Keep people informed and they feel more like they are part of the team and the vision.

Obviously every situation is unique. Don’t be ashamed to seek outside help. Creating unity takes time, prayer and hard work. Keep in mind that the process involves relationships, so it can be messy. Unity will likely involve people granting forgiveness and releasing the right to have things their way. Depending on the severity of the division in the church, these issues should certainly be shaping your teaching during this time. It may be subtle or more direct, but certainly deliberate.

Finally, for an illustration purpose, you might treat the process as you would if you were counseling a couple, only on a larger scale, of course. Identifying the underlying problems and offering small, steady steps to improving the relationships before you address the issues of division will help create unity.

4 Reasons People You Lead May Not Want to Learn or Grow

http://www.churchleaders.com/pastors/pastor-articles/287679-people-lead-may-not-want-learn-grow-ron-edmondson.html?mpweb=256-1853046-716263646

5 Helpful Questions When Attempting to Discern God’s Will

http://www.ronedmondson.com/2016/09/5-questions-to-discern-gods-will.html

12 of the Biggest Lies I’ve Heard People Tell

from Ron Edmundson

Lies concept.

Here are 12 of the biggest lies I’ve heard people tell:

I’m not going to let him (or her) hurt me anymore.

I don’t need any help.

I’ve got this under control.

I’m only going to try it one time.

God and I have an understanding.

I’m a self-made man. (Or woman)

I can stop anytime I want to.

That would never happen in my marriage.

Be honest with me. I can take it. I won’t be mad.

I don’t have time.

I’ll call you soon.

I’ll be praying about that.

10 Considerations for Understanding Biblical Faith

by Ron Edmundson on his very educational blog

Praying man silhoutte

Are you struggling to understand faith? 

To understand faith I always have to put it in terms of a relationship.  When we speak of a Biblical faith, we are speaking in terms of having faith…trusting…based upon our relationship with God through His son, Jesus Christ.

With that in mind…based on my understanding of Scripture…

Here are 10 considerations of understanding Biblical faith:

1. Faith is defined for us as “being sure of what we hope for and certain of what we do not see” (Hebrews 11:1-2)

2. Faith believes even when it makes no sense to believe, not because of the proof before you, but because of the trust you place in the object of your faith.

3. Faith is based on the will of that person in whom you place your faith, not my will. You can have faith that the person you love most will never hurt you, for example, but whether they do or not is up to their will, not yours.

4. Biblical faith is in a person, the person of God.  (God the Father, Son and Holy Spirit…they are One.)  Faith is not in me or my abilities, but on God and His abilities.

5. When Jesus used the illustration of moving mountains He was giving an example of the power of God and how we should place our whole faith in Him.  He was not talking about the power of my ability to have faith, but rather the power of the One in whom we place our faith.  If God’s will is to move a mountain, He will surely move it. You can even ask Him to by faith.  (Remember, Jesus also said, “apart from me you can do nothing”.)

6. When we talk about faith in God then, we are talking about His will, not our will.  That’s how Jesus taught us to pray….”Our Father, who is in Heaven…thy will be done…” Faith is based on God’s agenda, not my agenda. It’s not your ability to move mountains. It is God’s ability.   It’s not your will to move mountains; it’s God’s will.

7. Faith is based on the promises of God, not our hopes or desires. When you struggle with faith, you don’t doubt your ability; you doubt God’s ability. Sometimes we get upset that God hasn’t done something we think He should do, but God never promised to do it.  It may have never have been His will.

8. When you pray by faith then, you are praying that you trust God to do His will in your life, based not on your wishes or desires, but on what He has promised to do.  Some things we can always have faith that God will do, because he has promised to do them, such as “love you with an everlasting love” (Jeremiah 31:3), “work all things for good” (Romans 8:28) and “never leave you nor forsake you” (Deuteronomy 31:8). We can’t always know that God will heal every sickness, for example, because He’s not promised that He will. In fact, He promised we would have trials, but that throughout it all we could rejoice in our sufferings.

9. God is trustworthy…worthy of our faith. I love how The Message Version puts 1 Thessalonians 5:24, “The One who called you is completely dependable. If he said it, he’ll do it!” Do what?   His will. Faith in the person of God is based then on your trust that He is who He says He is and He will do what He says He will do.

10. When your faith lines up with God’s will, you can absolutely, positively, unquestionably claim by faith that God’s will be done. One of the reasons it is so important to know God personally is so that we will know His will, so we can know how to pray in God’s will. (Romans 12:1-2)