Sermon On Jesus Road to Emmaus Appearance

https://alightbreaksthrough.org/sermon-on-luke-24/

The Missing Woman of Emmaus

https://www.patheos.com/blogs/anxiousbench/2020/04/emmaus/

Unraveling Easter, and the Conflicting Gospel Stories

https://www.patheos.com/blogs/thenewparaclete/2020/04/unraveling-easter-and-the-conflicting-gospel-stories/

Why the Resurrection of Jesus Matters

Why the Resurrection of Jesus Matters

What’s the Difference Between the Resurrection of Lazarus and the Resurrection of Jesus?

https://chab123.wordpress.com/2019/09/24/whats-the-difference-between-the-resurrection-of-lazarus-and-the-resurrection-of-jesus-6/

10 Things The Resurrection Means For Christian Leaders

http://chucklawless.com/2019/06/10-things-the-resurrection-means-for-christian-leaders/

The Resurrection of Jesus and Historical Knowledge

~ Chab

Here is a chart on apologetic issues and the resurrection of Jesus. As you can see in many of the objections here, many of them deal with historical methodology.  I expand on several of these issues in my book  “The Resurrection of the Jewish Messiah.”  It is available on Amazon. 

Remember, proof, evidence, and knowledge are important terms that need defining. First, ‘proof’ is specifically a logical term, but people often use it as a synonym for evidence. A logical proof is a series of assertions listed as premises which provide a conclusion, whether deductive (certain) or inductive (probable). Second, evidence’ is related to induction in that it gives us knowledge of things that are probable. There are two types of evidence that are important for our discussion: direct and circumstantial. In a court of law, both are considered viable in establishing a case for a particular claim. If you have proof something is real, this means you are satisfied with what the evidence tells you. This brings us to our third term, ‘knowledge’. The theory of knowledge, epistemology, is part of a discussion in philosophy which reaches back thousands of years, and we have no space for delineating its meticulous varieties here.

How many times have we committed to things with neither exhaustive knowledge nor absolute certainty? When people take a job, pick a spouse, move to a city, or vote for a specific candidate, they all have limits to their knowledge. Despite this, they say, “I know this is the right job for me” or, “I know this is the right spouse for me.” Philosopher Paul Copan has wisdom here: “We can have highly plausible or probable knowledge, even if it’s not 100% certain. We can know confidently and truly, even if not absolutely or exhaustively.[1]

Find chart and rest at: https://chab123.wordpress.com/2019/07/23/the-resurrection-of-jesus-and-historical-knowledge/