J.I. Packer: How I Learned to Live Joyfully

http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2015/september/ji-packer-how-i-learned-to-live-joyfully.html

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Packer on the Christian Life Knowing God in Christ, Walking by the Spirit

http://servantsofgrace.org/packer-on-the-christian-life-knowing-god-in-christ-walking-by-the-spirit/

Is Your Joy Real Or Fake? Finding Help From J. I. Packer

http://www.samstorms.com/enjoying-god-blog/post/is-your-joy-real-or-fake-finding-help-from-j-i-packer

Packer On The Christian Life – book review

http://www.samstorms.com/enjoying-god-blog/post/packer-on-the-christian-life

Growing Into Humility

byJ.I. Packer

Spiritual health, like bodily health, is God’s gift. But, like bodily health, it is a gift that must be carefully cherished, for careless habits can squander it. By the time we wake up to the fact that we have lost it, it may be too late to do much about it. The focus of health in the soul is humility, while the root of inward corruption is pride. In the spiritual life, nothing stands still. If we are not constantly growing downward into humility, we shall be steadily swelling up and running to seed under the influence of pride. Humility rests on self-knowledge; pride reflects self-ignorance. Humility expresses itself in self-distrust and conscious dependence on God; pride is self-confident and, though it may go through the motions of humility with some skill (for pride is a great actor), it is self-important, opinionated, tyrannical, pushy, and self-willed. ‘Pride goes before destruction, a haughty spirit before a fall’ (Prov. 16:18).

As quinine is the antidote to malaria, so humility is the antidote to pride. In the sense in which Shakespeare’s Orsino in Twelfth Night sees music as the food of love, repentance should be seen as the food of humility. Or changing the picture, repentance should be thought of as the exercise routine that maintains humility, and through humility, health in the soul.”

~ Rediscovering Holiness, pp. 149-150

Christian Hope

Optimism hopes for the best without any guarantee of its arriving and is often no more than whistling in the dark. Christian hope, by contrast, is faith looking ahead to the fulfillment of the promises of God, as when the Anglican burial service inters the corpse ‘in sure and certain hope of the Resurrection to eternal life, through our Lord Jesus Christ.’ Optimism is a wish without warrant; Christian hope is a certainty, guaranteed by God himself. Optimism reflects ignorance as to whether good things will ever actually come. Christian hope expresses knowledge that every day of his life, and every moment beyond it, the believer can say with truth, on the basis of God’s own commitment, that the best is yet to come.

~J.I. Packer

Our representative and our substitute

God displays his righteousness by judging sin as sin deserves, but the judgment is diverted from the guilty and put on to the shoulders of Jesus Christ, the sinless Son of God acting as wrath absorber.

The atonement had to be costly because it was necessary in light of the nature of God, which must inflict retributive punishment on sin.

A marvelous wisdom of God consists in his establishing the Lord Jesus as our representative and our substitute because only he could bear and absorb the judgment due to us. Being our representative makes him our substitute, and so he suffers and we go free.

~ J. I. Packer “The Necessity of the Atonement” in Atonement, ed. Gabriel N. E. Fluhrer, pp 15-16