“You Shall Be Holy,” Says The Lord

If you’re  following Mark Robert’s daily bible reading chart for 2021, today you begin reading Leviticus for the next 9 days.

Are you getting excited yet?

This is a book often skipped in Bible reading charts. With its many details of sacrifices, religious rites and prohibitions, it’s easy to get bogged down and miss the point for 21st century Christians.

“The book of Leviticus was the first book studied by a Jewish child; yet is often among the last books of the Bible to be studied by a Christian.,” observed Chuck Swindoll.  ‘Today’s readers are often put off by the book’s lists of laws regarding diet, sacrifice, and social behavior. But within these highly detailed directives we discover the holiness—the separateness, distinction, and utter “otherness”—of God. And we learn how sin devastates humanity’s relationship with their Creator.”

For those interested, Robert Dobson offers a analysis of the book of Leviticus with its various laws, rituals, and offerings.

Leviticus can be summarized in one word:  “Holy.”   And in one verse:.  “For I am the Lord your God. You shall therefore consecrate yourselves, and you shall be holy; for I am holy.”  (Lev 11:44)

“Holy” literally means “set apart or separate.”  It is used in a moral sense in scripture.  Christians are to be separated from sin.  It means morally pure.  Religiously right.  Consecrated to God.

Continue: https://thepreachersword.com/2021/02/18/you-shall-be-holy-says-the-lord/

Holy, Holy, Holy

A Broadcast with R.C. Sproul

The Bible doesn’t just describe God as holy. It says He is holy, holy, holy (Isa. 6:3). Today, R.C. Sproul examines this attribute of God that is elevated to the highest degree.

How Can We Be Holy, As God Is Holy?

The Word tells us to be holy as God is holy, so how is that possible?

Holy, Holy, Holy

Perhaps one of the greatest attributes of God, if not “the” greatest attribute of God, is that He is holy. When Jews wanted to emphasize something, they would often repeat it, much in the same way that God often repeated a person’s name twice, but this repeating of the person’s name was an indication of a close, personal relationship. Jesus would say “Peter, Peter,” and later, “Saul, Saul.” In the past, God said “Moses, Moses,” or “Abraham, Abraham,” so importance or emphasis was often the purpose of repeating something or someone’s name, so what are we to make of Isaiah seeing the Lord on His throne, while the seraphim’s proclaim, “Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord of hosts; the whole earth is full of his glory” (Isaiah 6:3)! Here it is stated that God is not just “Holy, or “Holy, Holy,” but “Holy, Holy, Holy.” Repeating something three times is the greatest emphasis that could be given in Jewish literature, and as great of an emphasis as there is in the Bible, and it is reserved for God alone. God is so holy that it is beyond human comprehension, so how can we be holy as God is holy? Isn’t that asking the impossible?

False Converts

There will be many people that will be before Christ on Judgment Day, but many will hear the most shocking thing of their life. Jesus said of that Day, “Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but the one who does the will of my Father who is in heaven” (Matt 7:21), so doing God’s will is more important than saying, “Lord, Lord,” which again, repeating a name indicates a personal relationship, but they don’t really have one with Christ. They think they know the Lord, but Jesus doesn’t know them, and that has tragic consequences. The Lord said that “many will say to me, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and cast out demons in your name, and do many mighty works in your name” (Matt 7:22)? They thought they were doing things for Christ, but not actually doing the things He specifically commanded (i.e. Matt 25:35-36). They emphasized works and “doing” instead of the finished work of Christ, and as a result, Jesus says that “I declare to them, ‘I never knew you; depart from me, you workers of lawlessness” (Matt 7:23). It does not matter to Jesus if you say you know Him. What is of eternal importance is that He knows you. They relied on their works to be saved (Eph 2:10), instead of Christ to save them by grace alone. There are “many” who think they have this relationship with Christ (“Lord, Lord”) but these same many, not a few, will be turned away from the kingdom for all time.

Read more: https://www.patheos.com/blogs/christiancrier/2019/01/21/how-can-we-be-holy-as-god-is-holy/

A holy man!

~J.C. Ryle

Holiness is the habit of being of one mind with God, according as we find His mind described in Scripture. It is the habit of . . .

agreeing with God’s judgment,
hating what He hates,
loving what He loves, and
measuring everything in this world by the standard of His Word.

How Can We Be Holy, As God Is Holy?

The Word tells us to be holy as God is holy, so how is that possible?

Holy, Holy, Holy

Perhaps one of the greatest attributes of God, if not “the” greatest attribute of God, is that He is holy. When Jews wanted to emphasize something, they would often repeat it, much in the same way that God often repeated a person’s name twice, but this repeating of the person’s name was an indication of a close, personal relationship. Jesus would say “Peter, Peter,” and later, “Saul, Saul.” In the past, God said “Moses, Moses,” or “Abraham, Abraham,” so importance or emphasis was often the purpose of repeating something or someone’s name, so what are we to make of Isaiah seeing the Lord on His throne, while the seraphim’s proclaim, “Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord of hosts; the whole earth is full of his glory”(Isaiah 6:3)! Here it is stated that God is not just “Holy, or “Holy, Holy,” but “Holy, Holy, Holy.” Repeating something three times is the greatest emphasis that could be given in Jewish literature, and as great of an emphasis as there is in the Bible, and it is reserved for God alone. God is so holy that it is beyond human comprehension, so how can we be holy as God is holy? Isn’t that asking the impossible?

False Converts

There will be many people that will be before Christ on Judgment Day, but many will hear the most shocking thing of their life. Jesus said of that Day, “Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but the one who does the will of my Father who is in heaven” (Matt 7:21), so doing God’s will is more important than saying, “Lord, Lord,” which again, repeating a name indicates a personal relationship, but they don’t really have one with Christ. They think they know the Lord, but Jesus doesn’t know them, and that has tragic consequences. The Lord said that “many will say to me, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and cast out demons in your name, and do many mighty works in your name” (Matt 7:22)? They thought they were doing things for Christ, but not actually doing the things He specifically commanded (i.e. Matt 25:35-36). They emphasized works and “doing” instead of the finished work of Christ, and as a result, Jesus says that “I declare to them, ‘I never knew you; depart from me, you workers of lawlessness” (Matt 7:23). It does not matter to Jesus if you say you know Him. What is of eternal importance is that He knows you. They relied on their works to be saved (Eph 2:10), instead of Christ to save them by grace alone. There are “many” who think they have this relationship with Christ (“Lord, Lord”) but these same many, not a few, will be turned away from the kingdom for all time.

You Be Holy

The Bible calls us to be holy as God is holy, but God wouldn’t command us to do something if it were not possible, so it must be possible to become holy before God, or at least, in His sight. The Apostle Peter commanded us to be “like the Holy One who called you, be holy yourselves also in all your behavior” (1 Pet 1:15). He could have been quoting Leviticus 11:44-45, or Leviticus 19:2, or even Leviticus 20:7, but his point is well taken: “You shall be holy, for I am holy” (1 Pet 1:16), so how do we do that or how do we become holy? Is it even possible that fallen, sinful creatures can become holy? To answer this question, we must look to Jesus. The Apostle Paul tells us that it was “For our sake he [God] made him [Jesus] to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God” (2 Cor 5:21). Notice that it wasn’t for our sakes that He made us to be sinless, but rather, it was for Jesus’ sake. It was because of Him “who knew no sin” that Jesus became sin for us. This was the only way that “we might become the righteousness of Christ,” and being seen as having Jesus’ very own righteousness. Only then can we enter the kingdom. For everyone that has received the righteousness of Christ, they are not the same because, “if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation. The old has passed away; behold, the new has come” (2 Cor 5:17).

Finish up at: https://www.patheos.com/blogs/christiancrier/2019/01/21/how-can-we-be-holy-as-god-is-holy/

Do whatever makes you holy

http://gotherefor.com/offer.php?intid=29745&changestore=true

Holy, Holy, Holy – Sproul

https://us2.campaign-archive.com/?e=10e1a68c17&u=32a41d449a635dc91898c8337&id=c1a16716d2

How to fail in the pursuit of godliness

http://kuyperian.com/fail-pursuit-godliness/

Discovering the God of the Bible – podcast

http://www.ligonier.org/learn/conferences/discovering-god-bible-2017-regional-conference/holy-holy-holy/