No, Hebrews 11:1 Isn’t Advocating Blind Faith

Many atheists play word games when it comes to defining the word “faith.” They’ll reduce all religious faith to blind faith and then subject it to ridicule. That’s an easy way to score rhetorical points, but it’s also an anti-intellectual way to shut-down a serious discussion. The majority of Christian theologians throughout the centuries haven’t defined the faith this way.

That doesn’t stop critics from trying to redefine faith. In my last post, I discussed how atheists co-opt John 20:29 as a proof-text that Jesus praised blind faith when he rebuked Thomas. We saw from the context of John that the critic is way off-base, but the skeptics have another go-to passage to show that the Bible praises blind faith: Hebrews 11:1.

Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen.

Biologist and outspoken atheist Jerry Coyne provides a prime example of this when he writes:

“Faith involves pretending to know things you don’t. Behind it is wish-thinking, as clearly expressed in Hebrews 11:1: “Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.”

Another example of this attitude comes from the popular atheist YouTuber TMM, who says:

“Atheists will often define faith as something people have without any reason or evidence to support that belief. The reason why I think this is an accurate depiction of Christian faith is that this is how the Bible defines faith. Hebrews 11:1 explains that faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see. This passage explicitly states that faith is belief specifically in things that are not evident.” 

But is this really what the author of Hebrews had in mind?

Read on at: https://isjesusalive.com/no-hebrews-111-isnt-advocating-blind-faith/

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